The Old Joining Dots Blog

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27 May 2008

Life, Death and Twitter in Africa

A quick note. I tend not to blog about news unless it is something worth munching over (and preferably not being bounced around the Techmeme echo chamber). Instead, I share links through Twitter and FriendFeed (most come via Google Reader) and roll them up into a weekly post. If you want real-time updates, join in the fun on Twitter and/or FriendFeed

But this link on Wired deserves a post all to itself - Life, Death and Twitter on the African Savannah - talking about how social media is being used to raise awareness about and donations for a wildlife park in Kenya. Funds have dropped due to the recent political turmoil affecting tourism. Some sound bites here, but I recommend reading the full article.

...the blog raised $40,000 from donations in March. Kimojino's Facebook page drew about $2,000; and a handful of safari companies bought advertising on the blog in exchange for sponsoring rangers. "All the rest has been from single donations from individuals around the world, from donations as small as $5 to our biggest, which was $5,000,"

The man who helped set the blog up was discovered in the wilds of... Rotherham, a town up North here in the UK. Thanks to his blog attracting attention, he switched life as an office temp for life Stood in the Congo. I am truly envious :-)

Beyond blogging:

On a game drive one morning, the ranger stops his car in front of a herd of antelopes and whips out a camera. "I have never had a Coke's Hartebeest on Flickr," he says, taking a picture.

(If a certain fizzy drinks company had any sense, they'd donate some of their advertising revenue and sponsor that picture.)

What is most amazing - big companies reluctant to change should take note - is how traditions are adapting to blogging:

Getting online has not been without its risks for Kimojino. He explains that for him to be speaking about the park to the public, instead of his boss, breaks traditional Kenyan decorum and was at first difficult for him.

And balancing needs for digital and physical life:

...after a few months of this online activity, Kimojino went to the optometrist - he was worried the computer would damage his eyesight, hindering him from spotting, for example, a leopard in a tree two kilometers away.

Brilliant!